DUI Checkpoints in Pennsylvania

DUI Checkpoints in Pennsylvania

Where are the Sobriety Checkpoints in PA?

Explore comprehensive details about Pennsylvania DUI Roadblocks, sobriety checkpoints, and DUI checkpoints in this table. It provides insights into the city, location, and timing. If you’re on a mobile device, effortlessly scroll the table right to left, left to right, up, and down to easily view all the data!

CountyCityCheckpoint LocationTime
BedfordBedfordDUI check point and roving patrolsJuly 4th 2024 weekend
BlairHollidaysburgDUI check point and roving patrolsJuly 4th 2024 weekend
Clintoncheckpoints and roving patrols - PSP did not give details on the areas where the patrols will be conducted.July 4th 2024 weekend
AlleghenyPittsburghThe South Hills DUI Task Force and West Homestead Police will conduct the checkpoint on Becks Run Road - South Hills Area Becks Run RoadJune 21 through Monday, June 24, 2024
NorthumberlandRoving patrols or sobriety checkpointsFriday, June 21, 2024 through Sunday, June 30, 2024
MontourRoving patrols or sobriety checkpointsFriday, June 21, 2024 through Sunday, June 30, 2024
Centresobriety checkpoint in Centre County19 June 2024
SnyderPSP did not give details on the areas where the patrols will be conducted.Checkpoints and roving patrols will be set up on roads with high DUI rates from May 24-27 for Memorial Day weekend.May 24-27 during Memorial Day weekend
LycomingThe PSP didn't provide specific details on where the patrols will take place.Checkpoints and roving patrols will be set up on roads with high DUI rates from May 24-27 for Memorial Day weekend.May 24-27 during Memorial Day weekend
MonroeThe PSP didn't provide specific details on where the patrols will take place.Checkpoints and roving patrols will be set up on roads with high DUI rates from May 24-27 for Memorial Day weekend.May 24-27 during Memorial Day weekend
LuzerneThe PSP didn't provide specific details on where the patrols will take place.Checkpoints and roving patrols will be set up on roads with high DUI rates from May 24-27 for Memorial Day weekend.May 24-27 during Memorial Day weekend
CarbonThe PSP didn't provide specific details on where the patrols will take place.Checkpoints and roving patrols will be set up on roads with high DUI rates from May 24-27 for Memorial Day weekend.May 24-27 during Memorial Day weekend
LycomingUnspecifiedRoving DUI patrols and DUI checkpoints will be conducted throughout Memorial Day weekend in Lycoming County: Locations UnspecifiedMemorial Day weekend from May 24-27
SnyderUnspecifiedPolice Checkpoints and Mobile Patrols in Snyder County: Locations UnspecifiedMemorial Day weekend from May 24-27
NorthamptonBethlehemSobriety Checkpoints, Roving PatrolsMay and Jun 2024
FultonUndisclosed CityDUI CheckMemorial Day weekend: May 24th - May 27th.
LuzerneHazletonIncreased DUI Monitoring in Hazleton: Checkpoints and Patrols Targeting High-Risk AreasMemorial Day weekend: May 17th - May 19th.
LackawannaScranton - Electric CityGreen Ridge, Scranton PAThursday, May 2, 2024 - 6 PM to 12 AM
BlairUndisclosed CitySobriety Checkpoints, Roving Patrols and Cops in Beer Shops as DistributorsApril 2024
NorthamptonBethlehemDUI checkpoint - Undisclosed locationBetween Friday, April 5, and Sunday, April 7 2024
BucksWarringtonDUI checkpoint on Route 611 in WarringtonFrom 10 PM to 3 AM on Saturday 16 march 2024 St. Patrick’s Day weekend
DauphinDUI Checkpoint - Undisclosed locationSt. Patrick’s Day Weekend
BucksBensalemDUI Checkpoint - Undisclosed locationFrom 10 PM to 3 AM on Saturday 16 march 2024 St. Patrick’s Day weekend
CrawfordMeadvilleIn March, Crawford County will implement sobriety checkpoints and roving patrols at various times and locations to enhance road safety.March 2024
BucksPerkasieDUI Checkpoint - Undisclosed locationBetween Friday 16 Feb and Sunday 18 Feb 2024
LancasterLancasterDUI Patrols - Undiscloed LocationsFebruary 2024 Super Bowl Weekend
LancasterQuarryville BoroughDUI Patrols - Undiscloed LocationsFebruary 2024 Super Bowl Weekend
LehighLehigh ValleySobriety Checkpoints and DUI Roving Patrols - Lehigh ValleyDuring Super Bowl LVIII Weekend on Sunday February 11, 2024
LehighLehigh ValleySobriety Checkpoints and DUI Roving Patrols - Lehigh ValleyDuring Super Bowl LVIII Weekend on Saturday February 10, 2024
LehighLehigh ValleySobriety Checkpoints and DUI Roving Patrols - Lehigh ValleyDuring Super Bowl LVIII Weekend on Friday, February 9, 2024
LehighLehigh ValleyDUI Patrols on Super Bowl Sunday in Lehigh Valley by PennDOTSunday, February 4, 2024
MercerUndisclosed CitySobriety Checkpoint - Undisclosed PlaceUndisclosed Time - February 2024
ErieErieDUI Checkpoints - Saturation Patrols - Enhanced Enforcement - Alcohol And/or Drugs - Undisclosed Locations in Erie CountyFrom Friday, December 29, to Monday, January 1, 2024. New Years Eve Weekend, 2024
BradfordUndisclosed Citysobriety checkpoints and roving patrols roadways across PAFrom December 16th, 2023
Warren CountyUndisclosed CityUndisclosed locationFri., Nov. 24, 2023
BucksWarrington TownshipUI patrols along Street Road from Bensalem to Warrington Township10 P.M. To 3 A.M. Thanksgiving Eve on Wednesday, 22 Nov 2023
LuzerneWilkes-BarreNear Roadways DUI Patrols22 TO 26 November. Thanksgiving Weekend
MonroeStroudsburgNear Roadways DUI Patrols22 TO 26 November. Thanksgiving Weekend
LancasterUndisclosed CityDUI patrols - Undisclosed LocationThanksgiving 2023 weekend
YorkUndisclosed CityDUI patrols - Undisclosed LocationThanksgiving 2023 weekend
MontourUndisclosed CityUndisclosed Location - various roadwaysWeekend Holiday Season Nov 2023
NorthumberlandUndisclosed CityUndisclosed Location - various roadwaysWeekend Holiday Season Nov 2023
UnionUndisclosed CityUndisclosed Location - various roadwaysWeekend Holiday Season Nov 2023
LuzerneUndisclosed CityUndisclosed Location - various roadwaysHalloween 2023 Holiday Season
LuzerneWilkes-BarreAcross various roadwaysMon, 4 Sept, 2023
LycomingMontoursvilleAcross various roadwaysMon, 4 Sept, 2023
SusquehannaGibsonAcross various roadwaysMon, 4 Sept, 2023
WayneHonesdaleAcross various roadwaysMon, 4 Sept, 2023
CumberlandCarlisleCumberland CountySat Aug 12, 2023
MckeanLewis RunDUI Checkpoint in McKean CountyAug 10-12, 2023
ChesterAvondaleAll CityWeekend - Jul 14-16, 2023
NorthamptonBethlehemPatrols in the 3rd St - El Jefes AreaFri Jul 7, 2023
ErieErieIncreased Patrols for Stronger Alcohol and/or Drug EnforcementIndependence Day Weekend - Jun 30 - Jul 4, 2023
ClearfieldDu BoisClearfield and Jefferson CountiesMay 25 - Next 30 Days, 2023
PhiladelphiaPhiladelphiaIntersection of Kensington Ave and E Venango StSat Jun 24, 2023
AlleghenyPittsburghBecks Run Road MonitoringFri Jun 23, 2023
ChesterAvondaleDUI Checkpoint in the Chester County Avondale Barracks AreaWeekend - Jun 9-11, 2023
PhiladelphiaPhiladelphiaDUI Checkpoint and Roving Enforcement in Eastern Montgomery County / Springfield Township - Flourtown AreaWeekend - Jun 2-4, 2023
PhiladelphiaPhiladelphiaMonitoring of E Allegheny Ave between B and C St - Near Family DollarFri May 26 - Memorial Day Wknd, 2023
MonroeMount PoconoEnhanced Enforcement in Monroe CountyMemorial Day Wknd - May 26-29, 2023
MontgomeryCollegevilleTroop K Barracks Checkpoint in Collegville AreaMay 12-14, 2023
BerksReadingIncreased Patrols with Stronger Alcohol and/or Drug Enforcement in Berks CountyMay 6-8 - Weekend, 2023
PhiladelphiaPhiladelphiaCastor Ave - Near Aramingo AveThu Apr 20, 2023
DelawareMediaVigilance in Middletown TownshipFri Mar 17 - St. Patty's Day, 2023
BucksWarringtonMonitoring of PA-611 with Participation of Eight Different Police Departments10pm To 3am - Fri Mar 17 - St. Patty's Day, 2023
LehighAllentownCheckpoints and Enhanced Roving Patrols in the Lehigh Valley AreaFeb 9-12 - Super Bowl Wknd, 2023
LuzerneWilkes BarreFocused Enforcement within the City LimitsSat Dec 31 - New Year's Wknd, 2023
SchuylkillPottsvilleEnhanced Enforcement in the Schuylkill County AreaDec 2 To Dec 28, 2022

Are DUI Checkpoints Legal in Pennsylvania?

DUI checkpoints, also known as sobriety checkpoints, are indeed legal in PA. These checkpoints serve as a tool for law enforcement to combat drunk driving and enhance road safety. However, it’s crucial to understand the guidelines and procedures surrounding these checkpoints to ensure that your rights are respected during the process.

In Pennsylvania, DUI checkpoints must adhere to specific rules and regulations to maintain their legality. The checkpoints must be set up based on a predetermined plan, which includes factors like location, time, and duration. Additionally, law enforcement agencies are required to provide advanced notice to the public regarding the checkpoint’s presence. This notice serves to inform drivers and promotes transparency in the process.

At DUI checkpoints, officers are trained to follow a standardized procedure when interacting with drivers. While these checkpoints might seem intrusive, they are designed to be minimally invasive and respectful of drivers’ rights. During the checkpoint, officers may ask drivers to provide identification and related documents, but they cannot search the vehicle or its occupants without probable cause.

Even though DUI checkpoints are legal, you still have rights as a driver. You have the right to remain silent beyond providing identification and necessary documents. If officers suspect impairment, they may request that you perform field sobriety tests, such as the walk-and-turn test or the horizontal gaze nystagmus test.

How DUI Checkpoints Work in Pennsylvania

DUI checkpoints, also referred to as sobriety checkpoints, operate as a strategic tool in Pennsylvania’s efforts to combat drunk driving and enhance road safety. These checkpoints are temporary stops established by law enforcement agencies at predetermined locations and times. Understanding how these checkpoints function can help you navigate them confidently while upholding your rights and responsibilities as a driver.

Setting Up the Checkpoint

DUI checkpoints in Pennsylvania are typically set up by law enforcement agencies, including local police departments, the Pennsylvania State Police, and other relevant authorities. Before a DUI checkpoint is implemented, law enforcement agencies carefully plan its details.

When: DUI checkpoints are often set up during times when impaired driving is more likely to occur. This includes weekends, holidays, and other periods when people are more likely to be celebrating and consuming alcohol.

Where: The locations of DUI checkpoints are chosen based on factors such as historical DUI incident data, areas with a higher likelihood of impaired driving, and input from law enforcement agencies. They are often placed on well-traveled roads and highways to maximize their effectiveness.

Why: The primary purpose of DUI checkpoints is to deter impaired driving and make the roads safer for all users. They serve as a visible law enforcement presence to discourage individuals from driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs. Additionally, DUI checkpoints help to identify and apprehend individuals who are driving while impaired, preventing potential accidents and injuries.

The Checkpoint Process

When you approach a DUI checkpoint, you’ll notice warning signs alerting you to its presence. As you enter the checkpoint area, you’ll be guided by officers who will direct you to a designated area for assessment. While it’s natural to feel apprehensive, it’s essential to remain calm and follow the officers’ instructions.

At the checkpoint, officers will typically request your identification and vehicle-related documents, such as your driver’s license, registration, and proof of insurance. During this interaction, officers are trained to be respectful and efficient. If the officers have any reason to suspect impairment, they may engage in further assessment.

Assessment and Field Sobriety Tests

If officers observe signs of impairment or detect the smell of alcohol, they may ask you to perform field sobriety tests. These tests are designed to evaluate your physical and cognitive abilities, providing officers with indicators of potential impairment. Common field sobriety tests include the walk-and-turn test, the one-leg stand, and the horizontal gaze nystagmus test.

While you have the right to decline field sobriety tests, refusing these tests can lead to assumptions of impairment and potential consequences. It’s important to note that you’re also entitled to remain silent beyond providing identification and necessary documents.

Breathalyzer Test

In addition to field sobriety tests, officers may administer a breathalyzer test to measure your blood alcohol concentration (BAC). Pennsylvania’s legal BAC limit for driving is 0.08%. If your BAC exceeds this limit, you may face DUI charges.

Your Rights and Responsibilities

It’s essential to understand your rights when encountering a DUI checkpoint. You have the right to remain silent beyond providing identification and required documents. You can also decline field sobriety tests, although refusing a breathalyzer test can result in consequences such as license suspension.

Authorities Conducting DUI Checkpoints in Pennsylvania

In Pennsylvania, DUI (Driving Under the Influence) checkpoints are typically conducted by various law enforcement agencies at the state, county, and local levels. These agencies work collaboratively to deter impaired driving and ensure road safety. The specific agencies involved in conducting DUI checkpoints may include:

  1. Pennsylvania State Police: The Pennsylvania State Police play a significant role in conducting DUI checkpoints on state highways and roadways.
  2. Local Police Departments: Municipal police departments in cities and towns across Pennsylvania often set up DUI checkpoints within their jurisdictions.
  3. County Sheriff’s Offices: County sheriff’s offices may be involved in DUI checkpoint operations, particularly in rural and unincorporated areas.
  4. Task Forces and DUI Units: Some regions have specialized DUI enforcement task forces or units dedicated to monitoring and apprehending impaired drivers. These units often consist of officers from various agencies working together.

The specific locations, times, and frequency of DUI checkpoints can vary based on factors such as historical DUI incident data, areas with a higher likelihood of impaired driving, and input from law enforcement agencies. DUI checkpoints are typically set up during times when impaired driving is more likely to occur, such as weekends, holidays, and special events.

Pennsylvania is a diverse state with a variety of festivals and celebrations throughout the year. While many of these festivals are family-friendly and do not involve excessive alcohol or drug consumption, it’s important to note that some celebrations may include the consumption of alcoholic beverages.

  1. Groundhog Day (February 2nd): Punxsutawney Phil’s prediction of spring’s arrival is a quirky and widely known tradition. While alcohol and drugs are not the focus, some attendees may choose to indulge.
  2. Mardi Gras (Date Varies, February/March): Mardi Gras celebrations are not as elaborate as those in New Orleans, but some regions in Pennsylvania may hold events with alcohol consumption.
  3. St. Patrick’s Day (March 17th): This Irish celebration can involve the consumption of alcohol, particularly in cities like Philadelphia and Pittsburgh.
  4. Memorial Day (Last Monday in May): While primarily a day of remembrance, some people celebrate with outdoor barbecues and beverages.
  5. July 4th (Independence Day, July 4th): Fireworks, parades, and family gatherings are typical, and alcoholic beverages are often consumed.
  6. Labor Day (First Monday in September): Another holiday marked by picnics and outdoor activities, where alcohol may be present.
  7. Oktoberfest (Dates Vary, September/October): Pennsylvania hosts several Oktoberfest celebrations with beer, traditional German food, and music.
  8. Halloween (October 31st): Halloween parties may involve alcohol for adults, but it’s a family-friendly holiday for children.
  9. Thanksgiving (Fourth Thursday in November): A time for family meals, gratitude, and often accompanied by wine or other drinks.
  10. Christmas and New Year’s (December 25th and January 1st): Festive occasions with gatherings, food, and drinks, including champagne on New Year’s Eve.

Common Locations of checkpoints in PA

DUI (Driving Under the Influence) checkpoints in Pennsylvania can be established in various locations within cities and their local areas to deter impaired driving and enhance road safety. Here are 13 common locations where DUI checkpoints might be set up in Pennsylvania, along with a brief explanation of a few cities and their local areas:

  1. City Centers: Checkpoints are often placed in downtown areas to intercept drivers leaving bars, restaurants, or late-night events.
    • Philadelphia: Philadelphia’s city center is bustling with nightlife in areas like Center City and Old City, making it a common location for DUI checkpoints.
  2. Entertainment Districts: Locations near theaters, concert venues, and sports stadiums, where alcohol consumption is prevalent.
    • Pittsburgh: The South Side of Pittsburgh is known for its entertainment options and is a potential area for DUI checkpoints.
  3. Tourist Attractions: Areas around popular tourist destinations, such as amusement parks, may see DUI checkpoints.
    • Hershey: The vicinity of Hersheypark, a famous amusement park in Hershey, might be a checkpoint location.
  4. College Campuses: Proximity to college campuses where students may engage in drinking activities.
    • State College (Penn State University): DUI checkpoints may be placed near the Penn State campus.
  5. Major Highways: Checkpoints on or near major highways, as they are common routes for travelers.
    • Allentown: Interstate 78, which runs through Allentown, could be a location for checkpoints.
  6. Border Crossings: Locations near state borders may have checkpoints to screen out-of-state drivers.
    • Erie: Erie, being close to the New York state border, may set up DUI checkpoints.
  7. Residential Areas: Some checkpoints are placed in residential neighborhoods to target local traffic.
    • Lancaster: Suburban areas around Lancaster may host checkpoints.
  8. Transit Hubs: Areas around bus and train stations can have DUI checkpoints to catch intoxicated travelers.
    • Reading: Reading Transportation Center and its surroundings could be a potential location.
  9. Industrial Zones: Locations near industrial areas where workers may frequent bars after shifts.
    • Bethlehem: The Bethlehem Steel Stacks and nearby areas could see DUI checkpoints.
  10. Event Venues: Checkpoints close to event venues and concert halls.
    • Scranton: Montage Mountain Concerts and events might prompt checkpoint placement.
  11. Beach Towns: Areas near beach towns may see checkpoints during the summer season.
    • Ocean City: Locations near the Jersey Shore could have DUI checkpoints in the summer months.
  12. Rural Roads: Some rural areas may have checkpoints due to higher speeds and limited surveillance.
    • Gettysburg: The rural roads around Gettysburg may be monitored for DUI.
  13. Historical Sites: Locations near historical landmarks and attractions.
    • Valley Forge: DUI checkpoints may be placed near Valley Forge National Historical Park.

5 Legal Requirements for a DUI Checkpoint in PA

DUI checkpoints, also known as sobriety checkpoints, are an essential tool in Pennsylvania’s efforts to combat drunk driving and ensure road safety. These checkpoints are subject to specific legal requirements to protect drivers’ rights and maintain their legality. Let’s delve into the five key legal requirements that govern DUI checkpoints in Pennsylvania.

1. Advanced Public Notice

Before setting up a DUI checkpoint, law enforcement agencies are required to provide advanced public notice. This notice serves to inform the community about the presence of the checkpoint and promote transparency. By giving drivers prior knowledge of the checkpoint’s location and timing, law enforcement agencies aim to encourage responsible driving behavior and cooperation.

2. Predetermined Plan

DUI checkpoints must be established based on a predetermined plan. This plan includes factors such as the checkpoint’s location, time of operation, and duration. Law enforcement agencies analyze data on historical DUI incidents and areas with high rates of alcohol-related accidents to determine the most effective locations for checkpoints.

3. Neutral Formula for Stopping Vehicles

To avoid bias and ensure fairness, DUI checkpoints must use a neutral formula for stopping vehicles. This means that officers should follow a predetermined pattern for stopping vehicles, such as stopping every third or fifth vehicle. This approach prevents officers from exercising subjective judgment when selecting which vehicles to stop.

4. Efficient and Brief Stops

During DUI checkpoints, officers are trained to conduct stops efficiently and briefly. The goal is to minimize inconvenience for drivers while still assessing potential signs of impairment. Officers will typically request identification and vehicle-related documents, such as driver’s licenses and registration, in a respectful and straightforward manner.

5. Standardized Procedures

DUI checkpoints in Pennsylvania must adhere to standardized procedures to maintain consistency and fairness. Officers receive training on proper protocol, including how to interact with drivers, administer field sobriety tests, and conduct assessments. This standardization ensures that all drivers are treated equally and that their rights are upheld during the checkpoint process.

DUI Penalties in PA

Offense LevelBlood Alcohol Content (BAC)Penalties
First OffenseBAC: 0.08% to less than 0.10%– Minimum 6 months probation
– Maximum 6 months incarceration (based on case specifics)
– Fines ranging from $300 to $5,000
BAC: 0.10% to less than 0.16%– Mandatory Ignition Interlock Device (IID) installation for 1 year
– Alcohol Highway Safety School attendance required
BAC: 0.16% or higher– Increased penalties and fines
Second OffenseBAC: 0.08% or higher– Minimum 12 months license suspension
– Mandatory Ignition Interlock Device installation for 1 year or longer
– Jail time of 5 days to 6 months
Third OffenseBAC: 0.08% or higher– Minimum 12 months license suspension
– Mandatory Ignition Interlock Device installation for 1 year or longer
– Jail time of 10 days to 2 years
Fourth OffenseBAC: 0.08% or higher– Minimum 12 months license suspension
– Mandatory Ignition Interlock Device installation for 1 year or longer
– Increased jail time, potential felony charge
High BAC OffenseTier 2: BAC 0.10% to 0.159%– Higher fines and penalties
– Longer mandatory Ignition Interlock Device use
Felony OffenseInvolvement in serious injury or– Elevated to felony charge
death due to DUI– More severe penalties including significant prison sentences
– Potentially extended license suspension

Driving under the influence (DUI) is a serious offense in Pennsylvania, and the state has established strict penalties to deter individuals from getting behind the wheel while impaired. These penalties vary based on factors such as blood alcohol concentration (BAC), prior convictions, and the presence of aggravating circumstances. Let’s explore the numerical data behind DUI penalties in Pennsylvania to gain a clear understanding of the consequences involved.

1. BAC Limits

Pennsylvania law sets the legal limit for blood alcohol concentration (BAC) while operating a vehicle at 0.08%. For commercial drivers, the limit is lower, at 0.04%. Additionally, drivers under the age of 21 are subject to “zero tolerance” laws, meaning that any measurable amount of alcohol in their system can result in penalties.

2. First-Time Offense

For a first-time DUI offense with a BAC between 0.08% and 0.099%, the penalties include:

  • Probation: 6 months
  • Fines: $300
  • Alcohol Safety School: Mandatory attendance
  • Alcohol Treatment Program: If deemed necessary
  • Driver’s License Suspension: 6 months

3. Second Offense

For a second DUI offense with a BAC between 0.08% and 0.099%, the penalties include:

  • Imprisonment: 5 days to 6 months
  • Fines: $300 to $2,500
  • Alcohol Treatment Program: Mandatory participation
  • Driver’s License Suspension: 12 months

4. Aggravating Factors

If aggravating factors are present, such as a higher BAC level or prior convictions, the penalties increase substantially. For example, a second offense with a BAC of 0.10% to 0.159% results in:

  • Imprisonment: 30 days to 6 months
  • Fines: $750 to $5,000
  • Alcohol Treatment Program: Mandatory participation
  • Driver’s License Suspension: 12 months

5. Third or Subsequent Offense

For a third or subsequent DUI offense, regardless of BAC, the penalties include:

  • Imprisonment: 10 days to 2 years
  • Fines: $1,500 to $10,000
  • Alcohol Treatment Program: Mandatory participation
  • Driver’s License Suspension: 12 months

6. Ignition Interlock

Pennsylvania also implements an ignition interlock program for certain DUI offenders. This device requires drivers to pass a breathalyzer test before starting their vehicles. Offenders with multiple DUI convictions may be required to install an ignition interlock system for a period of time.

Costs of Getting Pulled Over in Pennsylvania

Getting pulled over by the police in Pennsylvania can hit a driver’s wallet hard. Here’s a breakdown of the expenses you could face:

Traffic Fine: Ranges from $300 to $10,000 depending on your blood alcohol content and the number of offenses.

Towing: A flat fee of $50 plus additional charges based on mileage.

Impound: Expect to pay $75 to $175 per day for impound fees.

Legal Fees: These can range from $2,000 to $8,000 or even more, depending on the complexity of your case.

Alcohol Evaluation: Costs between $35 and $100.

Accelerated Rehabilitative Disposition (ARD): This program can cost you anywhere from $100 to $1,800.

Education and Treatment: Plan to spend between $100 and $1,000 or more for these services.

License Restoration: For non-commercial licenses, it’s a $76 fee, while commercial licenses require $184.

Insurance Premium: You could see an increase of around $1,000 per year in your insurance premium, or your policy might even get canceled.

These expenses can add up quickly, making it essential to drive responsibly and avoid the costly consequences of getting pulled over.